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Fujifilm pros share their predictions for photography in 2022

This content is courtesy of Fujifilm.

As the pandemic disperses, Australians are once again searching for a creative outlet to explore beyond the confines of their homes and walls. In 2022, what are the artistic practices and values ​​that will shape photography? Hear from Fujifilm X photographers from the arts, documentary and ocean backgrounds about what they believe to be true in this space.

More fearless and adventurous photography.– Tamara Dean

As we begin to move beyond the pandemic, I would expect a more fearless and adventurous adoption of photography, as people go on journeys and adventures in the landscape. We’ve been closed for so long, so the urge to roam and capture the world outside our own four walls will greatly shape the landscape of imagemaking in 2022.

Taken on Fujifilm GFX100 and GF110mmF2 lenses. At the start of 2020, a few photographic works that Russell Ord had planned were put on hold due to COVID-19 lockdowns. Surfing for exercise was still allowed and with some free time, Russell naturally found himself at the Point surfing and snapping photos of the locals both in and out of the water. Cool images soon emerged and were turned into a coffee table book titled Main Break, featuring some of the local crew members whose lives revolve around surfing at Margaret River Mainbreak.

Commercial and outdoor projects are on the rise.– Russell Ord

Given the way the world is changing now and especially the rules and regulations in Australia, I suspect commercial photography will thrive. People will start to move away from the pre-made Instagram filters and opt for stunning images directly in the camera and, if necessary, proper and quality edits afterwards.

The same goes for the ocean, the surf, and any outdoor photography, as people crave that breath of fresh air and release of creativity while yearning to retain an authentic element to their work.

Fujifilm GFX100S, Tim Georgeson, as part of his project
Fujifilm GFX100S, Tim Georgeson, on his “Truth in Fire” project, a visually stunning and deeply moving journey into the world of Indigenous firefighters.

Authenticity is the key to storytelling.-Tim Georgeson

Authenticity is our path. Considering what’s happened over the past few years, I think people are tired of images that are too polished and thoughtful. COVID has highlighted more raw, intimate and personal moments that can easily touch the heart, and we’ll see a greater thirst to engage with what’s out there and understand reality as it is instead. only through a filter.

Imagery that has an element of raw realism is closer to how life is experienced outside of pixels and certainly more relevant to the viewer.

Fujifilm GFX100S + GF30mmF3.5, Tamara Dean
Fujifilm GFX100S + GF30mmF3.5, Tamara Dean

Photography in extreme environments.– Tamara Dean

The evolution of cameras has opened up a plethora of creative opportunities and one of them is photography in extreme environments. I took my favorite camera, the Fujifilm GFX100S, to very dusty places, exposed to splashing water and drastic changes in outside temperatures, and the camera was able to withstand those elements. Where once I wouldn’t dare bring a camera into these extreme environmental conditions, I can do so comfortably now.

Now that the world is opening up again, there is an urge to travel, find new places and reconnect. People are looking at the world with fresh eyes, and there is a tangible shift towards creativity and adventure, putting our environment first. I could see photography in extreme environments could be something that could explode in 2022.

Australia's wildlife has been hit hard by bushfires and human development, so it's a relief to find a few animals lucky enough to be in the care of a dedicated husband and wife team, Veterinary Surgeon Howard Ralph and his wife veterinary nurse Glenda Ralph.  Here, Howard holds an orphaned baby wombat after having a medical examination to check its health.  Fujifilm X-Pro3 + XF23mmF1.4 MK ll, Megan Lewis.
Australia’s wildlife has been hit hard by bushfires and human development, so it’s a relief to find a few animals lucky enough to be in the care of a dedicated husband and wife team, Veterinary Surgeon Howard Ralph and his wife veterinary nurse Glenda Ralph. Here, Howard holds an orphaned baby wombat after having a medical examination to check its health. Fujifilm X-Pro3 + XF23mmF1.4 MK ll, Megan Lewis.

More self-awareness and objectivity.– Megan Lewis

Coming from a background in documentary photography, I have always emphasized self-awareness in order to be more objective in my storytelling. It’s not always easy, but it could be essential for all of us if we want to find more clarity and integrity in our stories and our lives.

I realized long ago that when I realized I knew nothing then and only then did I start to know something. It motivated me to keep working on myself, to stay aware of my own fears and belief systems. In this way, it would help me to be more objective in my interpretation of a story or a state of being. If we can master this in ourselves first, then our work will have a chance to be more thoughtful or honest.

As our collective self-reflection over the past two years begins to spawn new forms of creative expression, 2022 will be a watershed moment for photography, marking a pledge of positivity for those of us hoping for a better year ahead. .

About the authors

Tim Georgeson is an Australian filmmaker, photographer and visual artist, documenting everything from cultural enclaves to areas of environmental and humanitarian crisis, to street life around the world. To learn more, visit timgeorgeson.com.

Tamara Dean is a critically acclaimed multimedia artist working in photography, installation and moving imagery, whose work explores the relationship between humans and the environment. See more via Michael Reid Gallery.

Megan Lewis is a Walkley Prize-winning photographer, author and lecturer whose work has been exhibited in Australia and internationally. See more at meganlewis.com.au.

Russell Ord is an internationally renowned photographer. He’s photographed world-class surfer magazine covers and helped deify celebrity chefs. He wandered with the Uunguu Rangers in outback Australia, crisscrossed tropical islands and followed his photographic instincts through urban meccas. Meanwhile, his ocean images are celebrated for simultaneously involving the cruelty and majesty of the sea. See more at Russellordphoto.com.